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Create a focal point with a feature wall

All interior designs benefit from a strong focal point; an ‘accent’ area that draws the eye or adds definition in a open-plan space. In the past, it might have been created by a stunning fireplace, or a piece of statement furniture or art. Now, its feature walls that are steering the trend and they offer a massive amount of scope for any room.

In addition to a contrast in colour, different materials and textures offer a wealth of design opportunities. For example, rustic wood cladding blocks can create a very snug-like ‘ski lodge’ feel. Try reclaimed barn spruce cladding and compare it to our old barrels cladding or consider instead our reclaimed beam cladding to achieve your ski lodge look.

Buy online from our full wall cladding range.

There’s also a growing trend to continue a wood floor installation onto a wall; this can provide a multitude of different looks, depending on the grain and style of flooring used.

A more feminine look can be achieved with mosaics, like Indigenous’ Mother of Pearl or Coconut designs. Installed behind a dressing table, or his and hers counter top basins, the tiny tiles can transform a dressing room or bathroom. For a more robust look, choose a stone mosaic like Indigenous Caribbean Stone Mosaics; their naturally undulating, weave format provides a stunning, textural backdrop, with a strong coastal feel.

To reinforce the look, keep adjacent walls neutrals. Then, after fixing, seal the wood or mosaics with a suitable water and stain proofing treatment to keep maintenance to a minimum – and, for cleaning, always choose a pH-neutral solution to protect the natural surface.

 

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